Why Gaslighting in a Relationship is More Common than You Think

Gaslighting is a form of emotional abuse where your partner or spouse tries to control you by making you doubt yourself. It’s a serious problem that can have long-lasting effects on your mental health and relationship.

Unfortunately, gaslighting in relationships is more common than you might think. In fact, research has found that around 15% of people have experienced gaslighting in a relationship at some point in their lives.

There are several reasons why someone might gaslight their partner. In some cases, it may be a way to control them or keep them from leaving the relationship. In other cases, it may be a way to manipulate them into doing something that they wouldn’t normally do.

Whatever the reason, why gaslighting in a relationship is always a form of emotional abuse and it’s important to be aware of the signs so you can protect yourself from it.

Gaslighting in a Relationship Signs to Look Out

Gaslighting in a Relationship Signs to Look Out

If you think you might be a victim of gaslighting, here are some signs to look out for:

1. You second-guess yourself all the time

Do you find yourself constantly doubting your own memory or judgments? If so, it could be a sign that you’re being gaslighted.

2. You’re always apologizing

Do you find yourself apologizing all the time, even when you know you haven’t done anything wrong? If so, your partner may be gaslighting you into thinking that you’re always in the wrong.

3. You’re always on edge

Do you feel like you’re always walking on eggshells around your partner? If so, it’s possible that they’re gaslighting you into feeling like you can never do anything right.

4. You have trouble making decisions

Do you find yourself second-guessing all of your decisions, even though you used to be confident in them? If so, it may be because your partner is gaslighting you into doubting yourself.

5. You question your reality

Do you find yourself questioning what’s real and what’s not? If so, it’s a sign that your partner is gaslighting you and causing you to doubt your own perceptions.

Conclusion

If you think you might be a victim of gaslighting, it’s important to reach out for help. Talk to a trusted friend or family member about what’s going on. You can also call a domestic violence hotline for more information and support.

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